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is an ordinance amending the environment code to restrict the sale or distribution on city property of drinking water in plastic bottles of 21 ounces or less, set city policy to increase the availability of drinking water in public areas, and bar the use of city funds to purchase bottled water, and making environmental findings. ~ water. >> and, supervisor chiu is the author of item number 1. supervisor chiu. >> colleagues, thank you. thank you, colleagues. i very much appreciate your consideration of our legislation to hopefully [speaker not understood] plastic water bottles on city property. in recent months as we've all seen the extreme water conditions and drought in our country, in our world, the need to combat global warming cannot be more urgent. as our city has led the fight for the environment, we need to be a leader to our addiction in plastic bottled water. our world was not addicted to plastic bottled water. only in the 1990s did the now $60 billion plastic bottled water experience growth based on marketing campaigns. but before that, [speaker not understood], everyone around the wo
hearing with the public utilities commission and department of the environment to review their plans for preserving water, and protecting san francisco's watershed from drought and fire, given we are in the midst of the worst dry spell in 100 years, and governor brown has asked all californians to reduce their water use by 20 city clerk: [hearing - drought preparations] sponsor: breed hearing with the public utilities commission and department of the environment to review their plans for preserving water, and protecting san francisco's watershed from drought and fire, given we are in the midst of the worst dry spell in 100 years, and governor brown has asked all californians to reduce their water use city clerk: [hearing - drought preparations] sponsor: breed hearing with the public utilities commission and department of the environment to review their plans for preserving water, and protecting san francisco's watershed from drought and fire, given we are in the midst of the worst dry spell in 100 years, and governor brown has asked all californians to reduce their water use by 20 ok
out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it has a beautiful
campaign to protect human rights and the environment. through our eight year old think outside the bottle campaign we've collaborated with over 140 cities, universities and many national parks to promote tap over bottled water. and san francisco will continue to play a lead role in this movement bypassing president chiu's ordinance. 2007, as supervisor mentioned, san francisco set a precedent for citieses across the u.s. by cutting spending on bottled water. we saved tax payers nearly $500,000 a year and underscored the importance of our public water system. supervisor chiu's ordinance build on that legacy by codifying this commitment into law and increasing access to public water on city property. it is an important step toward ensuring our community has access to choose clean and safe public water. and by reinvesting in and promoting public water over bottled water, san francisco will set an important example for other cities and people across the country. the bottled water industry has had misleading marketing [speaker not understood]. public water is much more regulated than bottled w
are a port. we are at the water's edge. we are in proximity to the water and the windy environment. we have a challenge trying to control waste and debris that gets into the bay. we've all heard about the pacific plastic jar, large texas size swirls of plastic in the ocean. we even had a tenant who built a boat out of plastic bottles to sail it through that plastic to bring it to attention. it is something we've been aware of sometime. we looked at this in part through our obligationed under the state municipal stormwater program which requires us to keep debris out of the waters of the state ~. we review every lease, license, or event for environmental conditions. and, so, we have been acute eye for the potential impacts of what occurs on port property. we also, like all departments, have a zero waste program, zero waste coordinator and climate liaison. so, we had a nexus of various environmental concerns that as i say are particularly acute because of a proximity to the water. so, with that in mind, we were concerned to look at ways to reduce the possibility of plastics getting into the b
from china built environment minister says beijing will cooperate to develop an advanced falling dust monitoring systems. a pro russian gunmen seize government buildings in a border region in ukraine raising fears of separatism in a country still reeling from the alister of its president from sunday's big and staff. that means it's thursday. they vary twenty seven here in korea my soul i'm moving on and sean went they do so much for joining us. we begin with the latest confirmation that north korea fired four short range missiles into the scene earlier this evening. for more details are still alive on the phone to my feet and knees correspondent up to one that you hardly know so far i can't tell yet if i needed a haircut for a good korea fired up for the gift pile of which are believed to have been thoughtful than in the pool at five forty two the atp. the forced to read her thoughts were bought from newark korea felt it during the week in an area with a gal could he be eaten or in the direction. they get it the mountainous region with a maple bar to pack. located forty km felt that n
environment offers different challenges. but there are some fundamentals that come into play. catherine parrish: i thinking limiting your exposure to germs and a balanced diet are the most important things i teach them about keeping their baby healthy... and then coming for shots. the immunizations we provide certainly make a huge difference. diseases that killed hundreds of thousands of people don't even exist in this country anymore. although some concern has been expressed about the possible side effects of vaccines, physicians firmly believe that the benefits far outweigh any risks. vaccines have eliminated polio, and all but wiped out measles, mumps and rubella. i think the reason why we're not seeing a lot of those illnesses is just because of that. not because we're necessarily a healthier population, but because we've taken steps to try and eradicate those diseases that we could eradicate. we have a tremendous number of vaccines we didn't have even when i started practicing, for instance, the h-flu vaccine which came out in the late 80s and we started giving it before the age of
predicted that in fact, there would have predicted the opposite. background in economics, environment, whet her the magistrates contributing to a lower forecast. it caught everyone off guard to% year over year on new home sales. existing homes is a different category. we had a great year. i appreciate the recognition. we are prepared for the continuation. the existing home sales we only give drivers for the first quarter every subsequent quarter we don't live for the year. but based what we have seen how sales will be down in the range of three through 5%. there is a reason. the price will be up 13 or 15% on existing home sales. either bright or wrong sales volume growth, the price is reacting to a the strong demand. manhattan has literally one month to drive prices. southern california we have weeks. the absence of the inventory is the single greatest concern as to the trend line for the recovery. lou: with the discussion document, i am absolutely buffaloed as to why the republicans would proceed with this document. start out with 10 percent surcharge for high-income earners? your initial
the opposite. background in economics, environment, whet her the magistrates contributing to a lower forecast. it caught everyo off guard to% year over year on new home sales. existing homes is a different category. we had a great year. i appreciate the recognition. we are prepared for the continuation. the existing home sales we only give drivers for the first quarter every subsequent quaer we don't live for the year. but based what we have seen how sales will be down in the range of three through 5%. there is a reason. the price will be up 13 or 15% on existing home sales. either bright or wrong sales volume growth, the pri is reacting to a the strong demand. manhattan has literally one month to drive prices. southern california we have weeks. the absence of the inventory is the single greatest concern as to the trend line for the recovery. lou: with the discuson document, i am absolutely buffaloed as to why the republicans would proceed with this document. start out with 10 rcent surcharge for high-income earners? your initial reaction? >> i applaud the intent. i think the timing is poor.
the that the evidence we brought out in the environment of public works committee was new and hadn't been adequately considered. that was dr. o'connor's work showing the downstream harm from those near the mining of the tar sands and the testimony from a community organizer in texas about those who have health damage because of the refining of tar sands-type crude oil. and then those who are near the pepco, the waste product of it in detroit and chicago with really telling stories about children literally having to flee the baseball field to get away from the cloud of choking dust that was blown off the dump. >> mm-hmm. dr. o'connor, i keep hearing this, that the tar sands oil is far more toxic than anything else that the being refined anywhere in the world. is that correct, sir? >> absolutely. >> it is correct that there's nothing worse coming out of the ground on the face of the earth than this oil that's going to come out of the tar sands. >> all the information we have supports that. >> dr. o'connor, how toxic is it when it comes to imposing possible health risks on society? >> i guess from the
you indicate that the unemployment rate, in his current environment, with 6.7% -- with longer unemployment, is not like 6.6% unemployment in normal times? >> but mike, how do you communicate that? >> it will be difficult to do that and you will have speeches you make to give people guidance on what is going forward. i want to ask about the statement of inflation not being a problem. betting that inflation will rise over the coming months and the question is, how much is slack is there. on bloomberg surveillance tomorrow -- they argued it -- he will argue, this is much more dangerous than people think. saywill see chairman yellen that they will follow strict policy that will look at the labor market for reasons that we mentioned but this is not the only thing they will look at. they will go day to day to make sure they are not too soft. >> what kind of market can ben bernanke handoff to janet yellen? >> i would much rather be in her spot than his spot in 2008. i think that ben bernanke did a wonderful job of communicating that we are moving to tapering, and handing chairperson
can come back tomorrrow. and we promise to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. wh a day. can't wait til tomorrow. neil: you have probably heard that delta will start taking your frequent flyer miles. and i bet you did not hear how some airlines are quietly letting those reedman fares die off or it no more special prices those flying out for their loved one's final arrangement. our friend found out the hard way and the fear he was used to up and vanished. we also have key bloggers here digging into this issue and also some warnings for those flyers who might be in for some interesting surprises. so what happened? >> you know, i had the misfortune of dealing with this person on monday. i lost a family member and i made the call to my favorite airline and the woman said, i'm sorry, we did discontinue debridement program. and that was about a thousand dollars to travel and she said i'm sorry, there's nothing we can do it all. it bothered me. i can afford it fortunately. but there's a lot of people that i
- biodiversity action plan - $250,000] sponsor: yee resolution authorizing the department of the environment to apply for a $250,000 grant from the california strategic growth council to create the biodiversity action plan , for the period of july 1, 2014, through june 30, 2015.city clerk: sf 51234 >>supervisor mark farrell: okay, thanks. we have guillermo rod riguez from the department of environment. >> this is to apply for the $250,000 grant for the california strategic growth to create bio diversity action plan. if awarded the department of planning will present bio diversity and master plan for san francisco and greening san francisco. >>supervisor mark farrell: colleagues, any comments. is there any additional public comment? seeing none, public comment is closed. can we accept this without objection. >> so moved. >> this item is accepted. madam clerk please call item 6 and 7 together. city clerk: item 6: [agreement - hdr engineering, inc. - construction management services - $27,500,000] 6. 131236 resolution extending an agreement for an additional six months between the public util
supply of hundreds of thousands of people. finally we must be mindful of the environment. first we operate in a time of severe budget constraints. as secretary of the department of homeland security, i therefore believe i am obligated to identify and eliminate inefficiencies, waste and unnecessary duplications of resources across the large and de-centralized bureaucracy, while pursuing important missions such as the recapitalization of the aging coast guard fleet. second, i am mindful of the surveys that reflect that morale is low. i intend to constantly remind our work force of the critical importance of their homeland security mission and that the department's greatest asset in pursuit of these mission is his our people. i will be a champion for the men and women of d.h.s., and i will advocate on their behalf. i look forward to working with this committee. the chairman is correct that i am actively working to fill the vacancies in senior management positions. i do that on a daily basis, and i look forward to a shared vision and a partnership with congress on our important mission
need to change the environment that we live in. so that means better policies, access and availability to healthier food for all americans, so in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and many efforts are under way to make that happen. >> is there any way, you mentioned the difference between what's happening in underserved areas as well as privileged areas. and you also mention the change in the women, infants and children nutrition program. how much of that can you break out. >> i know this is a small incident but how much do you know in these kinds of programs is it having an effect? >> well, we mow that children who are eligible for assistance like wic serve underprivileged chrn and those changes are very important for them. but if we pull apart the recent data we're talking about now and the decline in the obesity rates it starts to unravel when you look at the disparities. soç we know that white children have lower rates than black children and hispanic children. and the disparities are quite striking. and that tells us more effort has to be put into reaching underserv
, radio shack had a tough time in that environment, 4.5%, cutting the management they don't need, and earnings per share beating profit on a ride so sales were still little tricky but stock is doing well. adam: the s and p is on track for record close and the dow is climbing back from earlier losses, 35 points, mixed economic news. turmoil in ukraine, testimony on the hill, an opportunity to address concerns regarding recent soft economic data. >> since my appearance before the house committee on number of data releases point to softer spending. part of that softness may reflect weather conditions. is difficult to discern how much. adam: joining us is oppenheimer funds chief economist, how much of a player is the weather in the south economic data? >> they asked me to come back in april or may and i will tell you. if you didn't buy a house you didn't buy a car because of a blizzard, you might buy it later on. you didn't go out to dinner, that is pretty much spending this law so it is hard to say i was looking at history of past times, got a fight after a particularly bad winters,
to have him in this environment. >> our hearts go out to them for the unimaginable trauma that they've been through. >> it was expecting change prior to today. the time that the investigation continues, we've added a position to help them go through a process. >> uc berkeley's chance put out a statement saying sexual assault has no place on a college campus or anywhere in civilized society. >> in berkeley, i'm john sasaki, channel 2 news. >>> tonight, a 25$25,000 award is being offered over the case of the poisonous meatballs. last summer, a dog died in a similar incident. the ceo of yelp contributed most of that reward money. >>> the video is remarkable. an armed gunman thrown to the ground during a convenience store heist in the bay area. we tracked that man down and it tell you why he's being called a hero. >> and not the kind of video justin bieber wants to be featured in. a look at the moments just after his arrest last month in miami and what police say this showed. he had countless photos. >> plus the beauty pageant queen talks about life turned upside down by a cyber stalker
own it's particularly harmful for pregnant women. so e sethsd emit in the environment and in the clean indoor air is harmful. research is emerging and we're seeing the youth uptake where we see mixed results in terms of whether or not it helps people quit and it's not a harmless vapor. thanks >> good afternoon, commissioners i'm with the youth leadership institute we work with youth people throughout the city and e cigarettes came up as one of the issues that our youth cares about in the bayview and tenderloin etc. a few status tobacco companies actually control the vast majority of the e cigarette market. last year the city was vabld as a $2 billion industry and is growing. another fact there is a lot of marketing dollars into their product $201,220,800,000 and it's gone up draefk. the largest is owned by laura ladder and in he remembers of youth uptake there's been a doubling in the number of users in the last two years in 20114.6 tyrannies were using and it is definitely being market toward children and youth. i'm going to show you some adds. so like this is an ad that says it tast
equipment does not hold up to the harsh environment, which can represent the challenge. as john henry smith, one man is trying to eliminate one part of the challenge. >> i was watching a heartbreaking news story about children in war zones and it explained the six left therapy to bring them back to humanity was just to play. simple, unstructured play. >> that was all the inspiration tim janeghan needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to communities, but he knew they didn't last long in the harsh playing field found in those communities. that's when he imagined a solution. >> to make a ball for the children that would not go flat. they could play and get the therapy. >> tim janeghan is a lyricist, who worked with a number of famous musicians, including siting. when he mentioned the idea to sting, he not only liked the idea, he offered to fund the research and design phase of developing the ball. >> let this be so successful that i can do for someone else what he did for me some day. it was, you know, i still get emotional when i think about it. >> 11 months, two tries lair,
are not usually arrested and jailed? >> no, we have seen it in very restrictive environments so the central asian stands in china for example, there's been a crack down in foreign reporters. so this is really a worrying signal they are also going to go after foreign reporters. and it is one of the ways of giving out news -. >> egypt is a country that has been very close to the united states in the recent past. no amount of jake carney today at the white house brief and talking about these reporters will make egypt it seems simply say okay, go and sin no more. >> i think egypt is a critically important country. your four are among four that have been -- it's really almost impossible to be the critical of the government now. egypt is the most important country. it is critical to pay more attention, egypt hasn't gotten the attention it deserves. i think in the last seven or eight months and it is at a critical juncture right now. for more open debate about a range of issues. >> from freedom house, and from amnesty international, thank you very much for being with us today. >> thank you so much. >> b
and the coast guard will assess the impact to the environment. 14 homes had to be evacuated initially. the stench of gasoline so strong it could give you headache -- give you a headache. the backup extended for miles. on the northbound side, the direction of the commute was sluggish for most of the morning. in santa clara county, tara moriarty, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> for the first time in 20 years, new labels are coming to food packages. the nutrition facts being emphasized to help people make healthier decisions. >>> burnt piles of debris are all that's left after a fire ripped through a townhome. we'll tell you what's happened to the families displaced. $ [uncle]this is hopscotch,okay? uncle go one,two,one,two,one two,one. [niece]okay! [uncle]okay? [niece]one,two three,four,five,six,seven,eight! [uncle laughing] okay,we go the other way,okay? [niece]one,two,three,four,five, six,seven! [uncle laughs]there's ten spaces,you want to try again? [uncle]yeah? ♪ [ male announcer ] spring is calling. get sta-green fertilizer now just $8 at lowe's. ♪ >>> attorney general air irk holder
, language barriers with new schools they result in uncomfortable learning environments for new comers. >> we understand that the board and superintendant are aware of difficulties that new comer students are facing. that's why they have the department that is actively engaged in helping immigrant families and offers the new comers language path way. it's a design to serve those that arrive english learner students a period of just many and orientation before entering the english plus pathway. [speaking foreign language] >> i think the new comer pathway is an excellent start. but there is no one size fits all. each new comer student will face their own unique learning obstacles. we recommend you employ more resources to provide one object one tutoring for students at school. we believe if sfusd provides 1-2 hours of individualized english tutoring for new comers, everyday at school, this will help their learning and increase and encourage them to speak english and help anxiety from learning. this helps them and otherwise they shuts them down. [speaking foreign language] >> new comers coming t
you, mr. richie. supervisor tang, any questions? okay. thank you. mr. rodriguez from the environment department. >> good afternoon. i want to spend some time to talk about education activities that our department takes in support to get around conservation to city san franciscans and water users and we play a role to sf puc and do many activities. one that i wanted to focus on our if i can is our school education program and working with san francisco unified and various schools in order to do that. also i have a quick powerpoint. if we can put the that up as i walk through the items. since 2001 our school education team has been involved in water education. thanks to the support from the san francisco public utilities commission. we have designed a program called save our bay which we target to 5th grade classes merely teaching about water pollution prevention and promote water conservation. today we given over 800 presentation to 5th graders reaching about 25,000 students here in san francisco. in addition the team has developed a variety of fact sheets about environmental topics i
with our environments. they know our school and teachers and community and students. here is the reason. more money is spent or professionals and other support staff will be needed to travel to new sites for all over districts. this place has physical therapy, occupational therapy, everything right there. that would be so hard for a parent to take the kids somewhere else. in conclusion, we want to strongly encourage that you do not tear apart our community. in addition we would be happy if you could epithe -- keep the i talk program. this is a developing class. they want to keep their friends in wheelchairs with communication devices there, thank you. [ applause ] >> next speaker please. >> yes, good evening, hello my name is maria sanchez. this is pedro martinez. he has cerebral palsy. and he works with the -- to communicate with people and do homework. i have a bunch of stuff here and i have a lot at my house. like he wrote my journal, today is monday. he talked about the weather. i have a letter from the teacher when he got it wrong, the wrong words. he said, i want to do it again.
's taking place and chaos a that they are trying to create an environment of ungovern apparently. as we see, things are dying out in terms of the momentum that these protests have. i think it's unfortunate that they don't respect the rules of democracy and some of the constitution as well. it allows for a recall referendum against any elected official. if they want him out. >> if it's so democratic, why do they kink out cnn and correspondents, report that more than 60 reporters in venzuela have been beaten and their material stolen from them and you have the president calling anybody who opponents they can oligarchs and fascists? >> he has employed that language. i wouldn't contest that because he has done so and he is calling on a class of people who have eroded the democracy and that ran the country into the ground and that, you know, today, those same people, not all of them. >> some would argue with the socialist government has run the government in the ground. >> that's not true. you cited figures for inflation but they were higher before. >> they weren't. >> actually not when chavez.
and greenpeace cofounder patrick moore. he made these comments before the senate environment and public works committee. he left greenpeace because he says that group became more interested in politics than the environment. what an announcement from him. >>> men who wait too long to become fathers could put their children at greater risk of developing mental health problems. that's according to a new study that followed more than 2.5 million men for 25 years. researchers found a child born to a 45-year-old father compared to a 24-year-old dad was three times more likely to have autism, 13 times more likely to have adhd, 25 times more likely to be bipolar and twice as likely to have schizophrenia. this is video you have to see to believe. two guys in those wing suits flying past christ the redeemer statue in britain. look at this. the two daredevils making that jump from about 6,500 feet. they landed safely. and what was the first thing they did? what do you think? what do you think? >> they prayed. >> drank a beer. look at that. >> they earned it. >> how close they get. nerve wracking. see yo
, look, in a hyper partisan environment where he has to run for re-election, an issue like this can be polarized. any issue around race, as you know, wolf, sends people to their full rise corners. the last thing the president wants to do when he's running for re-election is to have a country more polarized. i think the beauty of this time now is you can have more risky conversations that are important for moving this country forward right now in his second term. so i'm thankful that he did. >> i want to play another excerpt from the president's powerful speech. cornell and don, both of you listen to this. >> no excuses. government and philanthropy, faith-based communities, we've got to help you knock down some of the barriers that you experience. that's what we're here for. but you've got responsibilities, too. and i know you can meet the challenge. many of you already are, if you make the effort. it may be hard, but you will have to reject the cynicism that the circumstances of your birth or societies injustices necessarily defines you and your future. it will take courage but you'
to incentives and health systems incentive changes, to less expensive environments that include clinics and home care. we're in the midst of a big transition overall. >> what is it that your company does exactly when you go in and try and streamline things? >> we're a performance improvement company that focuses on cost, in other words, how you procure all products. we have a $5 billion procurement business that helps hospitals buy what they buy, more importantly, how they use the products. there's a best practice out there but it's not used across the country. we take the process to what we know as best practices. >> you're trying to get people paid quicker, right? i mean, there's a million places to attack. are there too many -- what are your two or three primary ways of doing it? you can get bogged down being all things to all people. >> hospitals aline are over a trillion dollars vertically integrated in 5,000 locations, all very complex and all very different. we focus on cost reduction, clinical integration and payment and price integration so that what's being paid for the services render
experts say that's possible. but what if something in the environment is the culprit. state health officials have found nothing so far. you would think they would be working around the clock trying to find an answer talking to every single mom who's lost a baby. they're not and outrage is growing. here's senior correspondent elizabeth cohen. >> reporter: in the rural and fertile yakima valley, an alarming number of babies born with birth defects. anencephaly, babies born with much of their brain and skull missing. >> i was stunned. three in a couple month period of time. that's unheard of. they are such tragic, terrible outcomes. >> reporter: barron's shocking discovery prompted an investigation by the state health department, which showed that in three counties in a three-year period there were 23 cases of anencephaly, a rate four times the national average. what could be causing such a high rate here? is it just a coincidence or something more serious? this epidemiologist at the washington state health department conducted the investigation. >> did you find an answer? >> we have
to keep it that way. driven to preserve the environment, csx moves a ton of freight nearly 450 miles on one gallon of fuel. what a day. can't wait til tomorrow. liz: shares of best buy on the move to be profit expectations lee janzen analyst at janney montgomery scott, you were on a conference, what did you hear that surprise you? >> 18 months ago this country everyone thought was going out of business, actually argued today. and hybrid models are out there that the investments they make, the ones they're working on, making tough to compete with online. liz: will they have o downstairs' their retail store even more? >> they have markets where they have more density of stores than they need and over time it is inevitable that will happen. there taking hours out of the store because 12% of their business is now online. some productivity you don't need as much investment in energy and a. liz: the chart looks negative, the stock fell off a cliff. you sound positive. is there an opportunity? >> it is an opportunity. proof of concept will come in queue 4. even though they had lower number
's dedicated to minimizing its impact on the environment while teaching students about sustainability. >> the more we can create a model of, you know, this kind of living, you know, that ethic seeps into our culture at the school. >> reporter: they were installing programmable thermostats and replacing all the lights with cfls. in 2008 they installed a solar panel system of more than 2300 panels that offsets about 85% of the electrical bill. in the cafeteria, bins are labeled and every day the waste is taken for composting. >> we come down and we pour it in the bins and then we add water and manure and then some straw on top and we wait. >> we have kind of our sink dishwashing station. >> reporter: but the hub of the school sustainability program is its garden, an acre of land with garden beds, lemon trees an outdoor kitchen and chickens. >> it's nice to have all these things because we can really learn about how to keep the environment safe. >> reporter: by planting the food, they're learning about healthy eating. >> you planted the plant in the winter and then it grows in the spring
is he grew up in a more forgiving environment. and in hawaii, if you got in trouble, there weren't any real serious consequences, but on the streets of chicago, the consequences could be fatal. and he -- i was going to say, he feels this enormous responsibility to make sure that all of our children grow up and have the ability for that fair shot and opportunity to reach their dreams and so many children are being left behind right now. >> yeah, let's talk about it. he wants to bring a spotlight to this. >> yes, he does. >> how will this work? you talk about reaching out to corporations. what does that mean? explain the mechanics of the initiative. >> sure, let's go through that. already, we have ten foundations who are committed to putting up resources, in addition to the ones they've already put up, $150 million has already been spent, and they're prepared to invest an additional $200 million. and then we have a range of corporate leaders very engaged and interested in this issue. and what we'd like to do is let's look at the programs that work, like the "becoming a man" program in ch
for both advertisers and the environment. more than 262 million pieces of direct mail are delivered by the u.s. postal service each day. and according to the epa, half of all advertising mail gets tossed in the trash. >> certainly marketers and fundraisers don't want to send a marketing offer fundraising offer to a consumer who doesn't want to receive that. >> reporter: the direct marketing association says consumers fed up with junk mail can opt out on the website dmachoice.org. the dma receives 10 to 15,000 requests each month and boone says opting out can make a big difference. >> at least an 80% reduction in marketing mail offers. you make sure that you line the mail up. >> reporter: but amy prefers paper karma a free app that helps you reduce junk. take a pictures. mail with the name and address and the app contacts the company for you. >> it will turn green and say it was a success. >> reporter: something that's finally beginning to give amy's shredder a rest. direct mail is big business. it brings in $16 billion a year for the u.s. postals service. amy says the app has helped
an environment where survivors can feel like they can ask. >> according to police the number of sexual assaults reported here is about six. they acknowledge that many of the crimes go unreported. at uc berkeley, abc7 news >> police are asking for help tonight searching for three armed robbers expected to strike again, targeting north oakland businesses. police want to you take a look at the photos of the robbers they're suspected of committing up to five robberies plows say the men are armed with guns. here is a look at the third guy. this spree started last friday. police are also looking for a 2007 silver dodge nitro. >> a man facing attempted homicide after police say he intentionally crashed his car into a soun bay house. take a look at this picture from the campbell police department. you can see the front end of the acura flashed into the home on westmont avenue. the car has been removed, police say the man was driving with his girlfriend and two young children in the car they went to the hospital with minor injuries. no one was hurt the driver is also facing felony dui charges. >> the co
congress on hiv research and environment. and even elmo from sesame street asked lawmakers to support music programs in american schools. >> there are too many issues to expect people are going to focus on the range of important dates. >> if their celebrity can advance a cause, they're going to take advantage of the spotlight. abc news, washington. >> well parents of a 5-year-old boy in connecticut are demanding answers after his son was taken from school by the great grandfather of another student. the man told officials he didn't realize he had the wrong child until he got home he brought the boy back the family says they have no reason to believe the child was harmed but still, a lot of questions remain. >> he hasn't said a lot about it. very, very scared. the day of, once he got home. he's only five years old it's hard to extract information. >> well, the school immediately made changes to the pick up procedure but that is not nearly enough for the family. they're demanding a full investigation by police, including a background check of the man who took their child home. >> yikes coming
, the university, federal government, to create an environment where survivors can feel like they can ask. >> according to police the number of sexual assaults reported here is about six. they acknowledge that many of the crimes go unreported. at uc berkeley, abc7 news >> police are asking for help tonight searching for three armed robbers expected to strike again, targeting north oakland businesses. police want to you take a look at the photos of the robbers they're suspected of committing up to five robberies plows say the men are armed with guns. here is a look at the third guy. this spree started last friday. police are also looking for a 2007 silver dodge nitro. >> a man facing attempted homicide after police say he intentionally crashed his car into a soun bay house. take a look at this picture from the campbell police department. you can see the front end of the acura flashed into the home on westmont avenue. the car has been removed, police say the man was driving with his girlfriend and two young children in the car they went to the hospital with minor injuries. no one was hurt t
of the world sporting equipment does not hold up to the tough environment. one man is trying to eliminate part of the challenge. >> we were watching a news story about the flight of children in war zones and refugee champs. and the simplest most effective story was to play. simply and structured play. that was all the inspiration tim needed. he knew there were programs sending soccer balls to third world communities. he knew they didn't last long in the playing fields found in those communities. that's when he imagined a solution. >> making a ball that would not go flat so they could just play. >> tim janeghan is a lir cyst, working with musicians, including siting, when tim janeghan mentioned the idea to sting, he not only liked the idea but offered to fund the research and design phase of developing the ball. >> pleas let this be so successful that i can do for someone else what he did for me. i still get emotional when i think about it. >> 11 months, two tries later it created nearly an indesproductable ball made from foam that doesn't need to be inflated. >> when did you know you had somet
that are more adaptive to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. in december, 1977 california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the top soil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, toppled utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock. the plume rose 5,000 feet and spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento like a tidal wave. >> that top soil was shipped up here and just dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that top soil, valley fever spores. dr. lynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred cases from that dust storm here in sacramento. >> reporter: it killed six and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lower she knows. >> something in the air. >> reporter: and all it takes is a gust of wind. >> two cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area in the 1970s. it even killed one of the great apes at the san francisco zoo. the symptoms are common like the cold or flu and possibly a rash. >>> we are learning the c
more interested in politics than the environment. >> wind turbines could be damaged from hurricanes. they are showing the use of offshore wind turbines. in the case of a hurricane like katrina you need a farm more than twice the size for an impact. >>> nutrition labels will never be the same. we have a new look. >> if you are enjoying a bowl of cereal you are having more than a serving size listed on the box good companies started labelling documents fat was the focus. now they are more concerned about how many calories we consume. they will show them in larger boulder font. who really eats oent half a cup of cereal? you will be warned there are added sugars and even have nutritional advice with instructions to avoid too much or get enough of this. while the design of the new labels have not cbeen confirmed they are several years away they are around 2 billion doll laterals. >> live from the business channel for us. >>> time 46 after the hour. there's a brand new bieber video out. but it has nothing to do with his music. why it could get him into more trouble. >> turns out that gold
that are more adapted to those environments to succeed. >> reporter: if you think it's just a central valley problem, think again. >> large dust cloud -- >> reporter: in december 1977, california was in the middle of a major drought. strong winds near bakersfield scoured the topsoil creating a huge dust storm. it shut down highways, top tom delay utility towers, damaged property and killed livestock, tolled utility towers. it spread hundreds of miles as far as sacramento. >> that topsoil came here and dumped everywhere. >> reporter: in that topsoil, valley fever spores. dr. flynn was on duty at a sacramento hospital. >> we experienced several hundred case of cocci here in sacramento from that dust storm. >> it killed 6. and spores can now be found in chico and redding. as for lauer -- >> something in the air. >> reporter: all it takes is a gust of wind. sharon chin, kpix 5. >> a few cases of valley fever were reported in the bay area in the 1970s. the symptoms are pretty common, similar to a cold or flu. sometimes they include a rash. >>> bye-bye barge. the mysterious google barge is leavin
and comprehensive school, safety and supportive school environment but it is hard work. integrating all of these. and the staff that is going to be trained, in these different practices, needs to go back to the school and train their colleagues, and but perhaps in another one is the challenges is really kind of a shift in mind set, i mean that it is really about changing from a punitive mind set to a supportive and compassionate mind set and to be thinking more about support and not about the consequences for behavior and how we are going to react to those behaviors and that really changes someone's way of and as a principal and i can tell you that that is challenging work to talk with your colleagues, about you know, how to change the trajectory of that school. and so i think that those are difficult barriers to predict as to the time line and when that is going to come out but the time and i guess that you would say, the attitude and mind set. and major barriers. >> other comments, commissioners? >> commissioner wynn? >> thank you. >> and i just want to thank everybody for being here this even
considers media independent the environment in which reporters work, and transparency of government and private institutions that effect news gathering. this year, fin hand, the nether-land, and norway lead the list. but the u.s. regarded by many as the world's leading democracy, ranked 46th. one wrung above haiti. but questions the low rating for the u.s. >> i think overall, american journalists have very powerful protections, not the least of which is the everybody respect for rule of law in this country. the yep respect for free press. >> a lot of people look at the united states as a model. there needs sob some improvement regards the way they are able to do their jobs. >> now, here is an irony, president obama who was a constitutional lawyer, has doubled down on going after whistle blowers and the journalists who report their leaks. which was first issued by the bush administration is now being prosecuted by president obama attorney general errick holder. >> the so we know the government can access phone records, i'm wondering how that knowledge, that information is impacting e
is already baked in? >> the obamacare regulatory environment is one element of the change in health care where the cost of health care will continue to go up and software is a fundamental way to address that. we have been very active selling companies to the larger participants as they look to build up rotter solutions. >> what other subsectors of tax are hot right now? >> infrastructure software broadly. like sapy solutions and oracle. i think you can see companies like ca trying to change itself or companies that have gone private that are trying to transform companies to deliver solutions into the small and medium-size companies in the marketplace. >> one of the stocks we like to talk about is tesla. morgan stanley doubled their price target. would you buy tesla? >> i'm a technology banker and a big car guy, so i love the stock, does it have the chops to develop the solutions that? that is an unknown. it's interesting at risk dollars that may lay out in a big way or may not. it?ould you buy >> no. >> a lot of analysts still have a bye on it. we are on the market again and 30 minutes.
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